"Seder-Masochism" Work-in-Progress Screening in New York City, April 21, with QCO Artist-in-Residence Nina Paley

Seder-Masochism Work-in-Progress Screening PosterThursday, April 21st, 7:30pm at IFC Center in New York City (323 6th Ave)

Work-in-Progress screening of "Seder-Masochism", the upcoming new film by Question Copyright Artist-in-Residence Nina Paley.

Q&A to follow.

Advance ticket purchase required.

 This is not the finished filmThis is about 40 minutes of in-progress work -- the core musical scenes, featuring, in Nina's words, "Goats! Egypt! Plagues! Death! Idols! Commandments! Unsubtle phallic imagery! …and MORE!"  (And free matzoh.)  Q&A with Nina Paley will follow the screening.

Props to GKIDS for arranging this event!

See the announcement on Nina's blog for more about the film, including a great set of sample stills and animations.




If you like Nina Paley's work, and you like the fact that she supports her audience's freedom to share, please consider donating to to the Artist-in-Residence Working Fund.  QuestionCopyright.org is a 501(c)(3) organization and donations are tax-deductible in the U.S.




Congratulations to Creative Commons on new CC-BY-NV license.

Question Copyright congratulates Creative Commons on the release of the new Creative Commons Attribution No-Value 1.0 International license, which allows covered works to be distributed freely with proper attribution, as long as no recipient derives any value whatsoever from them, including but not limited to personal pleasure, commercial gain, or artistic benefit.


CC-BY-NV allows derivative works so long as the derivatives are also without value to anyone, but it can be explicitly combined with the No-Derivatives (NC) clause for good measure.  According to CC General Counsel Diane Peters, the new license cannot be combined with Non-Commercial (NC) clause, because lack of commercial potential is already implicit in the NV clause, but she added that "it can, however, be combined with the ShareAlike (SA) clause, not that it would do any good."

"The release of CC-BY-NV 1.0 International is the result of lawyers and other experts around the world coming together to ensure that artists who simply want to ensure that no one can experience enjoyment of their works have a place in the Creative Commons constellation too," said Creative Commons Executive Director Ryan Merkley.  "I'm enormously grateful to the entire CC team and to all the volunteers who worked so hard to get this out by the April 1st deadline."  Diane Peters noted "We already have a number of artists inquiring about applying the new license to their works."


Czech translation of our most popular article, "The Promise of a Post-Copyright World".

IdeasBy far the most popular article on this site (over half a million views now and counting) is The Surprising History of Copyright and the Promise of a Post-Copyright World.  Courtesy of Antonín Houska, it is now available in Czech (česky): Překvapivá historie copyrightu a příslib světa po něm.

Thank you, Antonín!

It's also been translated into Chinese, Polish, Latvian, and Italian.  We're very grateful to all the translators; it's a lot of work for a piece of that length.  But the existence of these translations should also serve as a reminder of the vast amount of material in the world that would be translated if it weren't restricted by copyright monopolies -- a topic we've covered in depth before.

Happy New Year, everyone.  Let's try to have more freedom in 2016 than we did in 2015.



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